Michael Olajide: King of His Fitness Niche

Want to know how to attract a specific type of client? You have to prove through specific actions and words that you really, REALLY “get” what they need. You can’t just blather on about “be your best self” or “balanced nutrition.”

Michael Olajide JrThis is what I’m talking about: Meet Michael Olajide, Jr., who essentially invented fitness boxing and fitness jumprope. He really exemplifies how to be supremely successful at targeting a niche.

His client base is fashion models. He has become the fitness guy for them. How? For starters, he has expertly refined workout methods to achieve very specific outcomes. Outcomes that runway models have to have.

What else makes him so good? Actually, several things. Read about Olajide, his techniques and his Manhattan studio, Aerospace High Performance Center. Then, do this simple self-test.

Self-Test

Write down 3-5 examples that illustrate how knowledgeable he is about this client base. Scroll down to see some of our answers.

And then do the test again–except this time write down 3 – 5 specific examples of what your best client segment needs, and how specifically you meet those needs, whether it’s nutrition, fitness, mind/body practice or another aspect of fitness, health and wellness.

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1) Models need to look like…models

What works for most fitness buffs won’t work for a runway model. Curves? No way. Washboard abs? Probably not a good idea. Olajide makes sure nothing in his routine will over-develop any muscle groups to the detriment of the willowy model body.

2) Been there, done that

As a former boxer, Olajide understands that achieving a certain weight for an event is crucial for professional success. His fashion model clients, much like boxers, have a performance weight and an everyday weight. That’s why he customizes workout intensity, duration and frequency for each person’s timelines and needs.

3) He evaluates individuals individually

Olajide says he sizes up the models, looking for signs of weakness or self-doubt. Why? So he can tailor the workout to empower them physically and mentally. He doesn’t prescribe a one-size-fits-all routine.

4) It’s mental too – and he factors that in

As a former boxer, Olajide knows first-hand that the extreme pressure to “make weight” means the workout goes beyond physical demands alone. Keeping the mind motivated helps ensure success. What helps with that? Routines that change moves every 90 seconds.

5) The details matter

Models come to the Aerospace High Performance Center to get their bodies in catwalk shape. But Olajide doesn’t lose sight of the fact that as models, their faces matter too (okay, probably a lot). That’s why he reminds them to keep their faces relaxed during the grueling workout. No new wrinkles on his watch.

The bottom line

Sure, it helps his public profile that he’s got clever phrases like “sleekify” and a distinctive look and personality. But none of that would matter if he couldn’t get the job done with clients.

Now, you try:

Write down 3 – 5 specific examples of what your best client segment needs, and how specifically you meet those needs, whether it’s nutrition, fitness, mind/body practice or another aspect of fitness, health and wellness.

 

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